covers for the record
When I understood that in order to be elegant, you have to wear different or new clothes every day, I ceased caring. It was such a bore. There is no retribution for such a thing. I imagine Hell is a place filled with people trying to be elegant. That’s what I’m talking about; you don’t try. Trying is SO embarrassing. One has to be naturally aloof. I had lunch with my grand-mother today. We looked at some old photos, which usually I do not. I understood something else, but I forgot what it was, a realization nonetheless. When I got out I was slightly changed, altered in a good and mild way. I love Schweppes, I want to drink a Schweppes, but before, I would like to be elsewhere. Two days ago I told a friend that I wanted music to be timeless, even if it’s ridiculous, since nothing lasts. I find it rather embarrassing when Ned Rorem says he is happy because his work will survive him. I think it’s a delusion. I believe in art, but I believe it when you do it. He’s right to be happy that perhaps some people will find pleasure, or comfort in it. Timeless doesn’t mean eternal, however.That should explain why I like sometimes music that is a little static. I like when there is silence in the music too, I mean, not just when it is at the beginning and at the end of a piece. Sam Rivers died recently. It is my homage to him. He was an elegant man, like Henry Threadgill and Don Cherry and others. It was sad news, although I’m not very conversant with his music. Though I listened to Streams several times before going to sleep for instance, and to a lot of other recordings. It mattered, and it still does. Dan Warburton is very fond of this Sam Rivers’ quote :”I listened to everybody I could hear to make sure I didn’t sound like them.” According to wikipedia, Dave Holland explains his “musical philosophy” by quoting Rivers too:”Sam said, ‘Don’t leave anything out — play all of it,’ ”. There is another story, which involves Cecil Taylor and Sam Rivers that I read there :
There is a story Rivers likes to tell about being in Berlin for a jazz festival in 1969. He is heading past the hotel restaurant when he spots jazz pianist Cecil Taylor, with whom he is sharing the festival stage. “Sit down with me,” Rivers recalls Taylor instructing him. Rivers mentions he has a car waiting to take him to an interview. “You’re Sam Rivers. Let them wait,” Taylor replies.“So I sat down and had breakfast.” 
That should give you a notion of that character.
Sam Rivers - Streams (1973)

When I understood that in order to be elegant, you have to wear different or new clothes every day, I ceased caring. It was such a bore. There is no retribution for such a thing. I imagine Hell is a place filled with people trying to be elegant. That’s what I’m talking about; you don’t try. Trying is SO embarrassing. One has to be naturally aloof. I had lunch with my grand-mother today. We looked at some old photos, which usually I do not. I understood something else, but I forgot what it was, a realization nonetheless. When I got out I was slightly changed, altered in a good and mild way. I love Schweppes, I want to drink a Schweppes, but before, I would like to be elsewhere. Two days ago I told a friend that I wanted music to be timeless, even if it’s ridiculous, since nothing lasts. I find it rather embarrassing when Ned Rorem says he is happy because his work will survive him. I think it’s a delusion. I believe in art, but I believe it when you do it. He’s right to be happy that perhaps some people will find pleasure, or comfort in it. Timeless doesn’t mean eternal, however.That should explain why I like sometimes music that is a little static. I like when there is silence in the music too, I mean, not just when it is at the beginning and at the end of a piece. Sam Rivers died recently. It is my homage to him. He was an elegant man, like Henry Threadgill and Don Cherry and others. It was sad news, although I’m not very conversant with his music. Though I listened to Streams several times before going to sleep for instance, and to a lot of other recordings. It mattered, and it still does. Dan Warburton is very fond of this Sam Rivers’ quote :”I listened to everybody I could hear to make sure I didn’t sound like them.” According to wikipedia, Dave Holland explains his “musical philosophy” by quoting Rivers too:”Sam said, ‘Don’t leave anything out — play all of it,’ ”. There is another story, which involves Cecil Taylor and Sam Rivers that I read there :

There is a story Rivers likes to tell about being in Berlin for a jazz festival in 1969. He is heading past the hotel restaurant when he spots jazz pianist Cecil Taylor, with whom he is sharing the festival stage.

“Sit down with me,” Rivers recalls Taylor instructing him. Rivers mentions he has a car waiting to take him to an interview. “You’re Sam Rivers. Let them wait,” Taylor replies.

“So I sat down and had breakfast.”

That should give you a notion of that character.

Sam Rivers - Streams (1973)

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