covers for the record
The preceding entry made me think of this lovely commercial (yes, that exists), slicker-than-slick Korean movie of last year, Sunny, the title of which was inspired by the song of the same name by Boney M. 
But now I am asking myself which jazz album I would advice to someone that professes to hate jazz. This person would have to be my friend, of course. I was thinking of Sound by Roscoe Mitchell: I love the unusual variety of instruments, and as the album unfurls, one feels some sort of irresistible vibe to it. Any other idea? I don’t know. But jazz is definitely an interesting thing, and for the last few months I’ve had a certain fascination with the mythology that I tend to naturally associate with it. Characters such as Steve Lacy, Cecil Taylor, Roscoe Mitchell and the likes are a lot more “mythological” than their rockish counterparts. I mean, Bob Dylan is dull compared to Steve Lacy, or even Miles Davis - read their biographies.
It was funny when Dylan wrote in Chronicles : “My friend Bono is a great storyteller, and he often likes to tell us stories, and we like to listen to them”, or something like that. I am not going to reproduce the writing of a book that I read in, perhaps, junior high school. Bono, the great storyteller… I don’t buy it though when he advertises with his wife for Louis Vuitton in a country that looks like Africa. Gorbatchev was a more appropriate, though mute, mouthpiece, for ironic reasons that are now merely comic, although tinged with a certain nostalgia.
I still don’t know what to think of Dylan, though, and as the question reoccurs from time to time, it annoys me. I guess he is a good enough songwriter and his interviews are sometimes “quite something”.
Baloney, baloney.
- One thing that I perhaps like in me is my predilection for English folk.
- Stop that nonsense.
- Ok, but I still like English folk, and have special sympathy for Sandy Denny and Anne Briggs.
Anne Briggs - S/T (1971)

The preceding entry made me think of this lovely commercial (yes, that exists), slicker-than-slick Korean movie of last year, Sunny, the title of which was inspired by the song of the same name by Boney M. 

But now I am asking myself which jazz album I would advice to someone that professes to hate jazz. This person would have to be my friend, of course. I was thinking of Sound by Roscoe Mitchell: I love the unusual variety of instruments, and as the album unfurls, one feels some sort of irresistible vibe to it. Any other idea? I don’t know. But jazz is definitely an interesting thing, and for the last few months I’ve had a certain fascination with the mythology that I tend to naturally associate with it. Characters such as Steve Lacy, Cecil Taylor, Roscoe Mitchell and the likes are a lot more “mythological” than their rockish counterparts. I mean, Bob Dylan is dull compared to Steve Lacy, or even Miles Davis - read their biographies.

It was funny when Dylan wrote in Chronicles : “My friend Bono is a great storyteller, and he often likes to tell us stories, and we like to listen to them”, or something like that. I am not going to reproduce the writing of a book that I read in, perhaps, junior high school. Bono, the great storyteller… I don’t buy it though when he advertises with his wife for Louis Vuitton in a country that looks like Africa. Gorbatchev was a more appropriate, though mute, mouthpiece, for ironic reasons that are now merely comic, although tinged with a certain nostalgia.

I still don’t know what to think of Dylan, though, and as the question reoccurs from time to time, it annoys me. I guess he is a good enough songwriter and his interviews are sometimes “quite something”.

Baloney, baloney.

- One thing that I perhaps like in me is my predilection for English folk.

- Stop that nonsense.

- Ok, but I still like English folk, and have special sympathy for Sandy Denny and Anne Briggs.

Anne Briggs - S/T (1971)

  1. coversfortherecord posted this
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